The Outlaws

Likelihood of attribution of a robbery: 

unlikely
possible
probable
near certainty
Name Personal data Description Picture

 

Attributable Robberies

 

Cole Younger Thomas Coleman Younger--born January 15, 1844 in Missouri, son of wealthy farmer, joined Quantrill's guerrillas in 1861, Captain in Confederate cavalry under Shelby. Sentenced to life in prison for the Northfield robbery and murders. In 1900 census occupation while in prison listed as "farmer". Paroled after 25 years in prison in Minnesota. In 1910 census in Jackson Co., Mo. as "lecturer".  Died March 21, 1916.

Wrote an autobiography in 1903:

Cole Younger autobiographyThe Story of Cole Younger by Himself: An Auto-biography of the Missouri Guerrilla, Confederate Cavalry Officer, and Western Outlaw (available from Amazon.com, now 30% off list price)

5', 11½", weight 230, reddish hair, balding

large, powerful, bald head, sandy whiskers (description from "The Northfield Tragedy" 1876)

"Cole Younger, the cool and desperate Cole..."

--Jim Cummins

"They were brave fellows. They were true men. There was not a coward nor a liar among them... They might not have been angels... They were changed with many crimes of which they were innocent." quote from Frank James, 1901

"...Cole is a consummate actor and an arch hypocrite." (opinion expressed after Cole's expressions of contrition after being captured for the Northfield robbery)

"I never, in all my life, had anything whatever to do with robbing any bank in the state of Missouri." --quote from Cole Younger

Cole Younger from Noted Guerrillas

 

Cole Younger shortly after capture in Minnesota

 

Cole Younger from his book, shortly after release from prison

Photo of grave from Find-a-Grave

Liberty, Missouri, bank, 1866 

Russellville, Kentucky, bank, 1868

Corydon, Iowa, train, 1871

Columbia, Kentucky, bank, 1872

Ste. Genevieve, Missouri, bank, 1872

Adair, Iowa, train, 1873

Gad's Hill, Missouri, train, 1874

Otterville, Missouri, train, 1876

Northfield, Minnesota, bank 1876

Ste. Genevieve, Missouri is dubious as to whether Cole was there. If he was not, and he was not directly involved in the Liberty, Missouri bank robbery, which is also a bit dubious, then he's telling the truth when he said he never robbed a bank in Missouri. This does leave open trains and stagecoaches, and non-Missouri banks.

Jim Younger James Hardin Younger--born January 15, 1848 in Missouri, joined Quantrill's guerrillas late in the war, captured with Quantrill in Kentucky and sent to Alton prison as a POW, paroled from there. Was deputy sheriff of Dallas Co., Texas 1870-71. Sentenced to life in prison for the Northfield robbery and murders. In 1900 census occupation listed as "farmer". Killed himself in St. Paul, Minnesota October 19, 1902, not long after being paroled from prison. A little shorter [than Cole], not such a powerful physique (description from "The Northfield Tragedy" 1876)

"...quiet, well-mannered... more of a 'listener' than a talker." --from Croy

"Oh! Jim, this is too bad. If it had not been for Cole and Bob you would never have been here. They enticed you to do this." --Retta Younger, sister of the Younger brothers upon seeing Jim for the first time in custody after Northfield  (from "The Northfield Tragedy" 1876)

"Jim Younger was cool and brave in battle..." --Jim Cummins

 

 

Jim Younger from Cole's book

 

Jim Younger shortly after capture in Minnesota

 

Photo of grave from Find-a-Grave

 

Adair, Iowa, train, 1873

Killing of Pinkerton agents Lull and Daniels, 1874

Northfield, Minnesota, bank 1876

Bob Younger Robert Ewing Younger. Born December 1853 in Missouri. Too young to have been an active war participant. Sentenced to life in prison for the Northfield robbery and murders. Died of consumption in prison in Stillwater, Minnesota September 16, 1889. Finest-looking man of the whole gang, youngest. 6' 2" tall, well-proportioned, brawny arms, thick neck. Features well-defined, well-cut lips, expressive mouth, chin prominent & rounded, sandy moustache, heavy projecting capacious brow. (description from "The Northfield Tragedy" 1876)

Had a ragged wound where the thumb was torn off and badly attended to (description provided to authorities by Hobbs Kerry)

"a soft-spoken, rather likeable lad..." --from Croy

"My brother John and I wanted our lives to return to the way they had been when our Pa was alive more than anything. We knew that would never happen..." Brant quoting Bob Younger

Northfield was his first robbery--said Bob Younger (from "The Northfield Tragedy" 1876)

 

Bob Younger from Cole's book

 

Bob Younger, shortly after capture in Minnesota

Photo of grave from Find-a-Grave

 

Adair, Iowa, train, 1873

Otterville, Missouri, train, 1876

Northfield, Minnesota, bank 1876

 

John Younger John Harrison Younger. Born 1851 in Missouri. At age 15 killed a man in January 1866 in self-defense. Early in 1870 lynched and badly hurt by a posse seeking information about Cole. Indicted for murder in Texas in January 1871 for killing a deputy sheriff who was attempting to arrest him. Killed by Pinkerton agents March 16, 1874.   "Poor John, he has been hunted down and shot like a wild beast, and never was a boy more innocent..." --from Cole Younger

Ste. Genevieve, Missouri, bank, 1873

Adair, Iowa, train, 1873

Killing of Pinkerton agents Lull and Daniels, 1874

Frank James Alexander Franklin James--born January 10, 1843 in Missouri. Step-son of a doctor turned farmer (Reuben Samuel). One of Quantrill's guerrillas. Married Annie Ralston ~June 1874 (Buel says Sept. 1875 in Jackson County). One son, Robert Franklin James born February 6, 1878. Died February 18, 1915.

Frank James Trial

About 6 feet tall, very thin, large nose, light complexion, light colored whiskers

"...nearly six feet in height, of slender, yet neat and trim build, who walked erect and with a quiet, easy and self-possessed gait..." --from Kansas City Times Oct. 6, 1882

"Generally dresses in dark clothes--long coat, and when on a raid wears black slouch hat...very thin through the temples. Eyebrows are medium heavy; eyes are rather deep set and have a wrinkle over them. Large mouth with scar on both sides." --from Dick Liddil

"...taller than Jesse...Frank's [face] was long, wide about the forehead, square and massive about the jaws and chin, and set always in a look of fixed repose...Frank laughed not at all...Frank was sober, sedate, a splendid man always for ambush or scouting parties..." --from Noted Guerrillas

"In a running fight, Frank James had few, if any, equals." --Jim Cummins

Frank James from Noted Guerrillas

 

1865

 

age 55

 

Photo of Frank James grave from Find-a-Grave

Liberty, Missouri, bank, 1866 

Russellville, Kentucky, bank, 1868

Gallatin, Missouri, bank, 1869

Corydon, Iowa, train, 1871

Columbia, Kentucky, bank, 1872

Ste. Genevieve, Missouri, bank, 1872

Kansas City, fair box office, 1872

Adair, Iowa, train, 1873

Gad's Hill, Missouri, train, 1874

Murder of Pinkerton agent Whicher, 1874

Otterville, Missouri, train, 1876

Northfield, Minnesota, bank 1876

Winston, train, July 1881

Blue Cut, train, Missouri, September 1881

Jesse James Jesse Woodson James--born September 27, 1847. Joined Quantrill late in 1863 (after the Lawrence raid). Badly wounded in the right chest in 1865 while attempting to surrender to the Federals (the injury played a factor in both his potential participation in some robberies, as well as identifying him later). Married Zee Mimms April 24, 1874. Two surviving children, Jesse Edwards James and Mary (Zee and Jesse had twins who did not survive infancy, ~1878). Killed April 3, 1882. tall, heavy, erect, high cheek bones, broad across face, darkish whiskers, dark hair (from Frank James trial)

"...five feet eleven and a half high, round face, pug nose, dark sandy whiskers and blue eyes. He weighed 195 pounds and stood very straight..." --testimony of Dick Liddil

"Height five feet ten and one half inches, eyes blue, complexion light, snaps his eyes when talking, they are large. Wears seven and one-eight hat and number eight boot. Nose short and turned up at the end. Round features, fleshy face. Whiskers sandy... first joint of third finger on left hand is gone...two bullet holes about three inches apart near the right nipple. Is bow-legged and steps very quickly. Is very graceful rider... When on a raid dresses very common, dark calico shirt and ducking overalls, pants in boots. Has white smooth hands, wears gloves." --from Dick Liddil

"...blue eyes--very clear and penetrating...his form--tall and finely molded...always a smile...long, tapering fingers...Jesse's face was something of an oval...Jesse laughed at many things...was light hearted, reckless, devil-may-care..." --from Noted Guerrillas

 

 

There are numerous other photos of Jesse James, and thought-to-be Jesse James, and of people claiming to have been Jesse James in many books and web sites. If even half of the photos claiming to be of Jesse James are truly him, he is probably one of the most photographed persons in the 1870s. This was an era when a person might have 2 or 3 photos taken in a lifetime. A wanted criminal would probably not want a lot of photos of himself floating about.

Photos of Jesse James grave from Find-a-Grave. Includes photos of Jesse dead, and of the house in which he lived when killed.

Liberty, Missouri, bank, 1866 

Russellville, Kentucky, bank, 1868

Gallatin, Missouri, bank, 1869

Corydon, Iowa, train, 1871

Columbia, Kentucky, bank, 1872

Ste. Genevieve, Missouri, bank, 1872

Kansas City, fair box office, 1872

Adair, Iowa, train, 1873

Gad's Hill, Missouri, train, 1874

Murder of Pinkerton agent Whicher, 1874

Otterville, Missouri, train, 1876

Northfield, Minnesota, bank 1876

Glendale, Missouri, train, October 1879

Winston, train, July 1881

Blue Cut, train, Missouri, September 1881

Arthur C. McCoy Born ~1825 in Ireland, St. Louis resident before the war, in a painting business, "Farmer and McCoy", operated from Thomas Farmer's father-in-law's hardware store in St. Louis. Married to Louisa Gibson with sons Joseph born 1856, and Arthur William born 1858. Daughter Elizabeth born 1861. Son Arthur William died Feb. 1864. Two sons, Lee and Eugene, born in the 1870s. McCoy was a Captain in Confederate cavalry under Shelby. Operated as spy and saboteur. Died by 1880. tall, about 6', very thin, weight about 140, blue eyes

 "...six feet and over, a little stooped about the shoulders, very long in the arms, having a stride like a racehorse... All the lower face was massive—the lower jaw especially square cut and huge. The eyes were of that cold, glittering, penetrating blue that might be cruel as a serpent’s, soft and tender as the eyes of confidence or trust..." --from Edwards

No known photos or drawings--if you know of any, please contact D. H. Rule

Russellville, Kentucky, bank, 1868

Gallatin, Missouri, bank, 1869

Ste. Genevieve, Missouri, bank, 1872

Adair, Iowa, train, 1873

Hot Spring, Arkansas, stage, 1874

Lexington, Missouri, omnibus, 1874

Gad's Hill, Missouri, train, 1874

Murder of Pinkerton agent Whicher, 1874

 

John Jarrette John Jarrette (or Jarrett or Jarett) born ~1836 in Kentucky. Brother-in-law of the Younger brothers. Married to their sister Mary Josephine, "Josie," Younger on May 8, 1860 in Cass County, Mo. Pre-war occupation carpenter. Lived in Jackson County, Missouri. Two children, son Jeptha, born ~1862, daughter Margaret, born ~1864. Believed to have died with his wife in a house fire (~1868), alternately told that he was killed near his home and his wife shot in the house which was then set on fire with the children inside (the children survived). This doesn't seem to have appeared in the newspapers--such an event is very unlikely to have been overlooked. Other stories say Jarrette lived to 1891 in California (source Jim Cummins) or on a sheep ranch in Arizona (source John N. Edwards). One of Quantrill's guerrillas, also a captain under Shelby. Said by McCorkle to be a Mason. "He never knew fear" --Cole Younger

"...an old hand at killing helpless men..." --from Croy

"John Jarrett... one of the most daring, desperate and shrewd of the gang, died in the Frisco Mountains of California in 1891..." --Jim Cummins. 

Cummins also said Jarrette was arrested for a stage robbery in California and that his daughter testified against him. Jim Cummins is not a totally reliable source, however, but the info does possibly fit with Edwards saying Jarrette was still alive at the time of "Noted Guerrillas," 1877. A statement by George Sheperd places Jarrette alive in Louisiana in 1872. Cummins, Edwards, and Sheperd all knew Jarrette quite well. Jarrette's children in Missouri by Josie Younger say they did not see him again after 1868, yet it seems likely that Jarrette did, indeed, survive after 1868, though his wife must have died then.

John Jarrette from "Noted Guerrillas"

John Jarrette from Cole Younger's autobiography

A good photo of Jarrette is also available in Brant's "Outlaw Youngers"

"John Jarrett who looked more like an everyday farmer than a soldier, had the implicit confidence of Quantrill, and when he had extra work to be done, called on John Jarrett to take the lead." --Jim Cummins

Liberty, Missouri, bank, 1866 

Lexington, Missouri, bank, 1866

Savannah, Missouri, bank, 1867

Richmond, Missouri, bank, 1867 

Russellville, Kentucky, bank, 1868

George Sheperd George Washington Sheperd (or Shepherd). Born January 17, 1842 in Missouri. With Quantrill. Married to Martha Sanders, John Jarrette's cousin (her first husband was Dick Maddox, married March 1861, he was killed shortly after the war's end). Convicted of the Russellville, Kentucky bank robbery, served three years in prison. Wife remarried while he was in prison, apparently without first obtaining a divorce from George. Sheperd is said to have killed James Anderson (brother of "Bloody Bill" Anderson) in Texas. At one point claimed he had killed Jesse James. Died February 23, 1917. had one eye

"...a patient, cool, vigilant, plotting leader..." --from Noted Guerrillas

 

"...quick, nervous, and brave." --Cole Younger quoted in The Border Bandits.

George Sheperd from "Noted Guerrillas"

 

George Sheperd from "Border Outlaws"

Photo of grave from Find-a-Grave

Liberty, Missouri, bank, 1866 

Russellville, Kentucky, bank, 1868

Oll Sheperd Oliver B. Sheperd. Born November 25, 1842 in Missouri. Cousin of George Sheperd. With Quantrill. Wife Mary Jane Vance, married February 2, 1860. He was 16, she was 21. Children Oliver B., Charles, Etta. Killed April 4, 1868 trying to avoid arrest for the Russellville, Kentucky robbery.  

Photo of grave from Find-a-Grave

Liberty, Missouri, bank, 1866 

Russellville, Kentucky, bank, 1868

Fletcher Taylor Charles Fletcher Taylor. With Quantrill. Later elected to Missouri State Legislature. Died ~1916. had one arm, lost right arm during war--there's a contradiction here, according to Edwards it was his right arm but a photo Yeatman identifies as having been taken post war, of Taylor, Frank and Jesse James, shows him clearly with a right arm. His left arm is hidden in the picture.

"Low, square about the jaws, the brow broad, the eyes prominent, the limbs rounded and heavily girt around the muscles, the chest and shoulders massive, tireless in energy, and with immense nervous power." from Noted Guerrillas

"...a veritable bulldog in battle...with a tenacity never surpassed." --from Noted Guerrillas

"One of his arms was shot away in a desperate combat.  The sight of one eye was for a long time endangered by another wound; for months he lay at the point of death with a bullet through his right lung, he was wounded in the left thigh and through his remaining arm, but he still survives a maimed, reticent, quiet citizen, making no moan over the past and well content that he got back from the strife with even as much of his frame as was left to him." - John N. Edwards from "A Terrible Quintette"

Liberty, Missouri, bank, 1866
Arch Clements Archibald J. Clements. With Bloody Bill Anderson. Killed December 13, 1866. small, blond, blue eyes

"...cool-headed, wary, vigilant...military character...killed just as thoroughly and as remorselessly [as Anderson]" --from Noted Guerrillas

 

Liberty, Missouri, bank, 1866
Jim Cummins James Robert Cummins. Born January 31, 1847 in Missouri. Son of Samuel and Eleanor Cummins. With Quantrill, and Anderson. Became a farmer in Arkansas. Married at age 63 to Florence Sherwood. Cummins lived in old age was at the Old Soldiers Home at Higginsville, Missouri for 27 years. Died July 9, 1929.Tried to turn himself in several times after the James Gang broke up but no one believed he was really Jim Cummins so was never tried for any crimes. In his book he seems a bit disappointed about this. Wrote a book in 1903 about Quantrill and the James-Younger Gang. meek-looking

"No one in the band ever had much use for the little sniveler and cry-baby." -- from Croy

 

Jim Cummins from his book, near the close of the war

 

Link to photos of Jim Cummins' grave on Find-a-Grave

 
Dick Liddil James Andrew Liddil, born September 15, 1852 in Jackson Co., Missouri. Probably with Bloody Bill Anderson (considering his birthdate this goes in the 'dubious' column). Served a term in prison for horsetheft in 1874 or 1877. Married to Mattie Collins. Turned state's evidence and testified against Frank James. Died in Kentucky July 13, 1901.

Milton Liddle m. Elizabeth Forsby 25 Oct 1849 in Jackson County, MO.

dark complexioned, dark hair, dark whiskers, average build and weight --from Frank James trial

from cover of "Life and Trial of Frank James"

Glendale, Missouri, train, October 1879

Winston, train, July 1881

Blue Cut, train, Missouri, September 1881

Clell Miller Clelland B. Miller (or Cleland D. or Clenand). Born ~September 1850 (date from census, other sources say January 9, 1850, date on tombstone is December 15, 1849) in Clay County, Missouri. Son of Moses Miller, a Clay County farmer originally from  Kentucky. Clell was with Bloody Bill Anderson at age 14 for three days. Captured by the Federals October 26, 1864 (engagement in which Anderson was killed). Held in St. Louis at Gratiot Street Prison. Reported to have said, "I have always been a loyal boy and never sympathized with the south." Father and neighbors attested that he had never aided the rebellion. Released April 1865. Clell is on the 1870 census still living at home working on the farm. Edward and three other brothers were also living there. Clell was arrested and tried for Corydon, Iowa train robbery--acquitted.  Killed at Northfield, Minnesota 5' 8" tall, hair dark reddish auburn, stouter than Stiles/Chadwell, face rounder

 

"...the clown, a short, stocky boy with a hearty laugh..." --from Croy

photo identified as Clell Miller (alternate possible identification is Ed Miller, Clell's brother)

not at his best... dead after the Northfield, MN robbery attempt

Photo of Clell Miller's grave from Find-a-Grave (use your back button to return here)

Corydon, Iowa, train, 1871

Columbia, Kentucky, bank 1872

Ste. Genevieve, Missouri, bank, 1872

Otterville, Missouri, train, 1876

Northfield, Minnesota, bank 1876

Charlie Pitts Samuel Wells, alias Charlie Pitts, killed near Madelia, Minnesota 5' 11½" , thick black hair, heavy moustache, dark-complexioned

5' 9½" tall, rather slight, regular features, straight black hair, stubby moustache (description from "The Northfield Tragedy" 1876)

 

"...usually a scowl on his face. He had a rough way of talking...almost a bark...given to swearing..." --from Croy

 

Pitts is the one summoned when "dirty work" is on hand --Hobbs Kerry as quoted by Detective McDonough

Otterville, Missouri, train, 1876

Northfield, Minnesota, bank 1876

 

 

Bill Chadwell William Stiles, alias Bill Chadwell, from Minnesota, convicted horsethief, killed at Northfield, Minnesota 6' 4½", face elongated oval with sharply cut features, high cheekbones, well arched brow, deep-set blue eyes, hair dark reddish auburn, inclined to curl, 23-25 years old (in 1876)

 "small man... seemed to have too many teeth. He was the 'talker' of the group..." --from Croy

dead after the Northfield, MN robbery attempt

Otterville, Missouri, train, 1876

Northfield, Minnesota, bank 1876

 

 

Allen Parmer Allen H. Parmer (sometimes Palmer) born May 6, 1848 (1900 census says Sept 1846) in Missouri. Mother Barbara. Allen Parmer had 4 siblings. With Quantrill, later with Shelby. Attended Bryant and Stratton's Business College in St. Louis 1867-68. Married Susan Lavinia James, sister of Frank and Jesse James, November 24, 1870. Children: Robert Archie, Flora, Allen, Susan Kate, Feta, Zelma. Moved to Texas, later arrested there for a Missouri robbery. Cleared and charges dropped. Susan James Parmer died in 1889. Allen Parmer remarried Sarah Katherine Ogden December 27, 1892. Parmer died October 25, 1927 in Texas. "No Guerrilla in the service of the South was cooler or deadlier; none less pervious to the influences and emotions of physical fear..." --from Noted Guerrillas

Liberty, Missouri, bank, 1866
Bud Pence

 

June 26, 2002- pictures and information on Bud and Donny Pence of the Liberty bank robbery

Thomas Edward (Bud) Pence, born Nov. 28, 1842 in Clay County, Missouri. Son of Adam and Ann Pence of Clay Co. Brother of Donny Pence (at least 8 other siblings). Lived near the James/Samuel family. Bud Pence died Sept. 15, 1880 in Nelson County, Kentucky, buried in Stoner’s Chapel Cemetery, east of Samuels in Nelson County; married Mary Rachel Samuels Dec. 1, 1867 in Nelson County (she was born Sept. 23, 1848, died Sept. 20, 1944, buried Stoner’s Chapel Cemetery, the daughter of Wilson and Martha Samuels and a sister to his brother Alexander’s wife). Moved to Nelson County after the Civil War. With Quantrill, and identified along with his brother Donny as a participant in the bank robbery at Liberty, Missouri, in February of 1866. They were living with Mary's widowed mother in Nelson County in 1880. The family is not found in 1900 in Nelson County, but Mary Pence is there in 1910 as Mary R. with a daughter and the family of A. W. Sherman.   "Among the bandits, positively recognized as participants in the robbery, were Oll Shepherd, Red Monkers and Bud Pence, but they eluded the officers cleverly, and very soon the chase was abandoned." --account of the Liberty bank robbery from "The Border Outlaws" by J. W. Buel

"...they were Frank James and Bud Pence; they got two sacks of meal from Minter. He afterwards learned that the bank had been robbed and said these were the sacks in which the money of the bank had been put." --statement of R. I. Stepp regarding the Liberty bank robbery from Jim Cummins' book

Photos of A. D. Pence and Thomas Edward Pence scanned from photocopies of the originals in the A. D. Pence collection at the Kentucky Historical Society Museum, provided courtesy of Richard Pence. Photos are copyrighted and may not be reproduced without permission.

Photos of Bud and Donny Pence and more information on the Pence family on this website by a member of the Pence family. Thanks to Richard Pence for providing photos and family history information.

Liberty, Missouri, bank, 1866
Donny Pence Alexander Doniphan (Donny or Donnie) Pence, born Aug. 15, 1847 in Clay County, Missouri. Son of Adam and Ann Pence of Clay Co. Brother of Bud Pence. Donny died Feb. 25, 1896 of typhoid at Samuels Depot, Nelson County, Kentucky, buried at Stoner's Chapel Cemetery, Nelson County. Married Sarah Isabel (Belle) Samuels Nov. 10, 1870 at Samuels Depot (reported in a Clay County paper on Nov. 18, 1870, she is buried in Stoner's Chapel Cemetery, but her stone is missing, daughter of Wilson and Martha Samuels. They moved to Nelson Co in 1866 after being identified, with brother Bud, as among those who held up a bank in Liberty, Missouri, in February of 1866. From 1871 Donny was a respected sheriff or deputy in Kentucky for 30 years. With Quantrill. His home at Samuels Depot was believed a haven for Frank or Jesse James; Frank James was among those at his funeral. Obituary mentions no children.    

Photos of A. D. Pence and Thomas Edward Pence scanned from photocopies of the originals in the A. D. Pence collection at the Kentucky Historical Society Museum, provided courtesy of Richard Pence. Photos are copyrighted and may not be reproduced without permission.

Photos of Bud and Donny Pence and more information on the Pence family on this website by a member of the Pence family. Thanks to Richard Pence for providing photos and family history information.

 

Liberty, Missouri, bank, 1866
James Wilkerson James W. Wilkerson (or Wilkinson), born 1845. With Quantrill. Married Barbara Jane Gray March 8, 1864--a "shotgun" wedding.      
Clarence Hite Clarence Browler Hite. Born ~1862. Son of George B. Hite and Nancy James Hite of Logan County, Kentucky. Cousin of Frank & Jesse James. Arrested in Kentucky February 11, 1882 and taken to Missouri (with dubious attention paid to extradition laws and procedures). Sentenced to 25 years in prison for the Winston robbery, died of consumption in 1883 shortly after release from prison in Missouri. Confessed shortly before his release. Tall, slender, light complexion, front teeth large and bad, little fuzzy whiskers --from Frank James trial

Slender, "a stripling", very loose in his movements, light-haired, no whiskers, 5' 8 or 9" tall --testimony of Frank James

"...tall and slender, blue eyes, light hair, large mouth, and one or two teeth out." --testimony at Frank James' trial of Sarah Hite, step-mother of the Hite brothers

 

Winston, train, July 1881

Blue Cut, train, Missouri, September 1881

 

Wood Hite Robert Woodson Hite. Born ~1850. Son of George B. Hite and Nancy James Hite of Logan County, Kentucky. Cousin of Frank & Jesse James. As of 1870 still living and working on father's farm in Kentucky. Killed by Dick Liddil and Bob Ford December 4, 1881 in the home of Martha Bolton, widowed sister of Bob & Charley Ford.  Average height, stoop shoulders, light complexion, heavy build, not much whiskers, very slouchy --from Frank James trial

5' 9½" or 5' 10" tall, eyes black or gray, hair light, whiskers darker, dark sandy, a little stoop shouldered, large prominent nose, high forehead, weight about 150 lbs. --testimony of Frank James

"Wood Hite was about five feet eight inches high, had dark hair and light blue eyes. He had a light mustache, Roman nose, narrow shoulders, a little stooped. He was inclined to be quick in his actions." --testimony at Frank James' trial of Sarah Hite, step-mother of the Hite brothers

from cover of "Life and Trial of Frank James"

"...a great admirer of himself, as well as of the opposite sex..." --from Triplett

"When did they first commence coming there?" "About 1865, and some of them have been here nearly every year since." - quote of George T. Hite (brother of Clarence & Wood Hite) about the James brothers visits to the Hite home in Adairville, Kentucky --from Triplett

Glendale, Missouri, train, October 1879

Winston, train, July 1881

Blue Cut, train, Missouri, September 1881

Bill Wilkerson             
Red Monkers

June 19, 2002--the identity of the elusive "Red Monkers" of the Liberty bank robbery revealed.

Red Monkers, or Munkres, or Munkris, or Munkirs. Spelling vary--"Munkirs" seems to be the primary spelling and is used in cemetery records.

Redmond David Munkirs, Born March 26, 1845 in Missouri. Son of Solomon Munkirs and Sarah Ferril of Tennessee.

Probably with Quantrill.

Married Martha Elizabeth "Mattie" Marton, daughter of Thomas Marton and Elizabeth Cole). 

Red was shot and killed at age 21 on his front porch May 18, 1867 in a confrontation with a group of unidentified men. His only child, daughter Lorene Redmond Munkirs, was born five weeks later on June 22, 1867.

Red "Monkers" was one of three men identified as former guerrillas who committed the Liberty bank robbery with the other two being Oll Shepherd and Bud Pence.    

Redmond David Munkirs

family photos courtesy of and © Gerry Munkres Davis (gerrydavis@attbi.com)

Mattie Munkirs, wife of Red

 

Liberty, Missouri, bank, 1866
Joab Perry Born ~1836 in Missouri of John and Permelia Perry farmers of Jackson Co., Mo. With Quantrill. Arrested for horse theft June 1866.            Liberty, Missouri, bank, 1866
Frank Gregg Jacob Franklin Gregg. Born March 22, 1844 in Missouri. Son of Jacob and Nancy Gregg of Jackson County, Missouri. Father a merchant, some brothers were school teachers. Guerrilla under Blunt & Jarrette. Also served under Shelby. Gregg was arrested March 17, 1869 in Independence for a killing during the war, tried in Lexington and acquitted due to the intersession of Jo Shelby (says Edwards). Married Sallie C. Gilliland February 11, 1872. Lived in Texas 1872-77. Died August 26, 1906. "...a giant is size and strength" --Noted Guerrillas

Would they surrender? "Never!" shouted Gregg, in a voice that might have been heard a mile, "never while there is a leg to stand on or a bullet to kill. Look out, for we are coming!"--from Noted Guerrillas

Liberty, Missouri, bank, 1866
Ben Cooper               
Tucker Bassham Daniel Tucker Bassham. Farmer from Jackson County, Mo.

Confessed to Glendale robbery.

"...a simple-minded farmer... a naturalborn human jackass." -- Robertus Love in The Rise and Fall of Jesse James  

"Bassham, judging from his appearance, is a man whose ignorance makes it almost impossible of belief that he should be party to a successful train robbery." --from Border Bandits  

Glendale, Missouri, train, October 1879
Ed Miller Edward T. Miller. Brother of Clell Miller. Born ~1856. Son of Moses Miller, a Clay County farmer originally from  Kentucky. Ed was killed by Jesse James December 1881.        Glendale, Missouri, train, October 1879

Blue Cut, train, Missouri, September 1881

Hobbs Kerry Named and gave detailed descriptions of participants of Otterville robbery, at which he held the horses. Served two years in prison for the robbery. "none-too-bright"-- from Croy

"...a raw recruit and considerably much of a crack-brained simpleton." --Robertus Love

A drawing of Hobbs Kerry? This picture from "The Border Bandits" is captioned "Hobbs Kerry Watched by a Detective in a Gambling Den", but the identification of which of the five men in the drawing is Hobbs Kerry is uncertain.

Otterville, Missouri, train, 1876

 

Bob Ford Robert Newton Ford. Born January 31, 1862. Killed Jesse James in 1882--pleaded guilty to 1st degree murder, sentenced to be hanged but was quickly pardoned by the governor of Missouri. Acquitted for murder of Wood Hite. Ford died violently in his Colorado bar June 8, 1892, killed by Ed O. Kelly. Uncle William H. Ford married Artelia Cummins September 21, 1862 in Clay County, Missouri. Lafayette Munkirs officiated--kin to the elusive Red Monkers. Artelia was the sister of Jim Cummns. Birthdate shown on tombstone identified as Bob Ford's is Dec. 8, 1841, which isn't correct. He was not over 40 years old when he killed Jesse James.

Son of Thomas Ford.

"...rather slender, not very robust, yet wiry and evidently capable of great endurance, as well as being shrewd and brave. His eyes are sunken,  of a hazel color, and are large, restless, and piercing. His forehead is high, and his hair is thin, short, and of a light brown color. He is about 5 feet 8 inches high, and wears a nut-brown suit. He would never be singled out of a crowd as a youth of qualities worthy of especial notice." New York Times, April 5, 1882

"Bob Ford I don't trust; I think he is a sneak; but Charlie Ford is as true as steel." --Jesse James as (allegedly) quoted by Frank Triplett   

"He pulled off his pistols and got up on a chair to dust off some picture frames, and I drew my pistol and shot him." --Bob Ford quoted by Triplett at the inquest into the death of Jesse James

"The dirty, little coward..." --popular ballad

 

Bob Ford's Creed, Colorado tent-bar, in which he was killed (courtesy Western History/Genealogy Department, Denver Public Library)

 
Charlie Ford Charles Wilson Ford. Born July 9, 1857. Participated in the killing of Jesse James, pleaded guilty to 1st degree murder, sentenced to be hanged but was quickly pardoned by the governor of Missouri. committed suicide May 4, 1884. Age given as 24 at inquest into death of Jesse James. "...larger [than Bob], both taller and broader. His hair is dark, eyes brown, and he is dish-faced. His lower jaw protrudes, and he has a decidedly bull-dog look, and is, if anything, more brutal and braver than his brother Robert. It is evident that Charles would be a bad man in a fight, and while Robert is perhaps the schemer, Charles will come in for the cold-blooded and brutal work. The boys are cool and self-possessed, and move with a firm and solid tread." New York Times, April 5, 1882

"I had my finger on the trigger and was just going to fire, but I saw his shot was a death shot and did not fire." --Charles Ford quoted by Triplett at inquest into the death of Jesse James

Blue Cut, train, Missouri, September 1881
Bill Ryan Alias Tom Hill. Born ~1851. Irish. Tried for Glendale train robbery, convicted and sentenced to 25 years in prison October 15, 1881 based on testimony of Tucker Bassham. Released April 15, 1889. "That damned Irishman..." --from Horan, Desperate Men

 

Bill Ryan, or possibly, identified as such by the Pinkertons (from Yeatman's "Frank and Jesse James")

Marker by building in which Bill Ryan was arrested. It reads "In this building, then a combination saloon and grocery, W. L. Earthman, magistrate and ex-constable of Davidson County, on March 25, 1881, arrested Bill Ryan, alias Tom Hill, ruthless and indiscreet member of the James gang, members of which were living in the Edgefield neighborhood. Frank and Jesse James and their families left the Nashville area the next day."

 

pictures courtesy of, & ©2002, Linda Snyder

 

Glendale, Missouri, train, October 1879
 

 

 


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